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Invited Speakers

Renato TURCHETTA (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory)

Ultra-high speed, high resolution CMOS Image Sensors

Title: Ultra-high speed, high resolution CMOS Image Sensors
Author: Renato Turchetta
Affiliation: Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
Email: renato.turchetta[at]stfc.ac.uk
URL: http://www.technologysi.stfc.ac.uk/Our+capabilities/
Detectors+and+Electronics/CMOS/44162.aspx
Abstract: Since their early days, CMOS image sensors were recognised as the solution of choice for high-speed imaging. Megapixel resolutions in the thousands frames per second, corresponding to pixel rate in the order of 10Gpixel/sec have been achieved. The speed of CMOS image sensors have continuously increased over the years, although at a relatively slow pace. It is only recently that innovations in the field have taken these sensors in the area of ultra-high speed imaging, with frame rates in excess of millions per second.
This talk will review the state-of-art and focus on the Kirana sensor. Based on in-pixel storage of consecutive frames, acquired at a speed of up to 5 million frames per second, it also features resolution close to a megapixel in a 35mm compatible format. The Kirana sensor breaks the barrier of the Terapixel/sec. The talk will present the main features of the sensor and review the latest results.
Biographical Sketch: He received the Laurea (Master degree) in Physics at Milan University (Italy) in 1988 and the Ph.D. in Applied Physics from the University of Strasbourg (France) in 1991. He was Assistant Professor there until 1999 before moving to the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, near Oxford (UK), where, since 2005, he leads the CMOS Sensor Design group. He is senior fellow of the Science and Technology Facilities Council since 2009. Renato’s group develops CMOS image sensors for scientific and other high-end applications. He is co-author of over 100 papers on solid-state detectors, low-noise, microelectronics and CMOS image sensors in international journals as well as of 8 patents on CMOS image sensors. He was on the technical committee of IISW2009, is a member of the programme committee of Image Sensor Europe since 2011 and of Pixel since 2008. From this year, he is also a member of the International Scientific Advisory Board. He is director at vivaMOS, a startup commercializing the wafer-scale CMOS image sensor developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

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