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Ryohei FUNATSU (NHK: Japan Broadcasting Corporation)

“133Mpixel x 60-fps” is achieved by a single image sensor with a fine CMOS process and ultra-fast signal transmission technology

Title: 8K Ultra-high-definition Television Camera Technologies
Author: Ryohei FUNATSU, Kazuya KITAMURA, Toshio YASUE, Tomohiro NAKAMURA, and Hiroshi SHIMAMOTO
Affiliation: NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation), Japan
 
R. Funatsu

K. Kitamura

T. Yasue
 
T. Nakamura

H. Shimamoto
 
Abstract:
8K ‘Full-featured’ camera with three 33Mpixel 120-fps CMOS image senso Compact full-resolution 8K camera with a 133M-pixel 60-fps CMOS image sensor
8K Ultra-high-definition television (UHDTV) is a next generation broadcasting system that realizes an extremely high sense of presence and reality. The 8K broadcasting service will start in 2018 in Japan, and NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) is conducting research and development on8K UHDTV equipment. In this paper, we describe the development of 8K camera systems. 8K UHDTV video format is standardized in ITU-R, and it requires a high resolution of 33-Megapixels for RGB colors, high frame frequency of up to 120-Hz, wide color gamut, and high dynamic range (HDR). To meet these requirements, NHK has been developing high-performance image sensors and camera systems. One is a full-featured 8K camera that covers all 8K video format in the highest parameter including 120-Hz scanning and HDR. The other is a downsized full-resolution 8K camera that realizes full-8K resolution with a one-chip image sensor and successfully reduces the size and weight to approximately one-seventh the previously used 8K cameras. We also describe key technologies and cutting-edge progress of the 8K UHDTV camera, including image sensors, 8K image shootings, and program productions.
Biographical Sketch: Ryohei FUNATSU: He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in electrical and electronic engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 2000 and 2002, respectively. He joined Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) in 2002. Since 2004, he has been engaged in research and development of ultra-high-definition television (UHDTV) camera systems at NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories. He is a member of the Institute of Image Information and Television Engineers of Japan (ITE).

Kazuya KITAMURA: He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees from Chiba University, Chiba, Japan, in 1998 and 2000 respectively, and the Ph. D degree in nanovision technology from Shizuoka University in 2014. He joined NHK in 2000. From 2003 to 2016, he engaged in research and development on imaging devices and 8K cameras at NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories. He is currently a senior manager at NHK Engineering Administration Department. He is a member of IEEE and ITE.

Toshio YASUE: He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in applied physics from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 2006 and 2008 respectively. From 2008 to 2012, he worked at NHK as a Broadcasting Engineer. Since 2012, he has been working on research and development of 8K cameras and image sensors at the NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories. He is a member of ITE.

Tomohiro NAKAMURA: He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Waseda University in 2006 and 2008, respectively. He joined NHK in 2008. Since 2012, he has been engaged in research and development of 8K camera systems at NHK Science and Technology Laboratories. He is a member of ITE.

Hiroshi SHIMAMOTO: He received the B.E. degree in electronic engineering from Chiba University in 1989, M.E. and Ph.D degrees in information processing from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1991 and 2008, respectively. In 1991, he joined NHK. Since 1993, he has been working on research and development of UHDTV cameras and image sensors at the NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories. In 2005-2006, He was a visiting scholar at Stanford University. He is a member of the IEEE and ITE.

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